Physical Rehabilitation For Severs Disease

Overview

Sever?s disease, or calcaneal apophysitis, is a common cause of heel pain in patients whose bones are still growing; however, it is not really a disease. The pain is caused by stress at the point where the Achilles tendon meets tissue called the plantar fascia on the growth plate (apophysis) of the heel bone (calcaneus).

Sever’s affects boys more often than girls. Boys are most often affected at age 12, and girls at age 9, though Sever’s is typically seen in children and adolescents between the ages of 7 and 15.

Causes

The usual cause is directly related to overuse of the bone and tendons in the heel. This can come from playing sports or anything that involves a lot of heel movement. It can be associated with starting a new sport, or the start of a new season, or too much weight bearing on the heel. Also, excessive traction could cause this, since the bones and tendons are still developing. Many children who over pronate their feet exhibit symptoms and in most patients, it usually involves both heels.

Symptoms

Symptoms of calcaneal apophysitis may include Pain in the back or bottom of the heel, Limping, Walking on toes, Difficulty running, jumping, or participating in usual activities or sports, Pain when the sides of the heel are squeezed.

Diagnosis

Sever?s disease can be diagnosed based on the symptoms your child has. Your child?s doctor will conduct a physical examination by squeezing different parts of your child?s foot to see if they cause any pain. An X-ray may be used to rule out other problems, such as a broken bone or fracture.

Non Surgical Treatment

Although most cases do get better on their own, recovery typically takes several weeks or months. Adolescents can continue to play sports if the activity does not cause discomfort, but staying active does prolong the recovery period without treatment. As a result, rest and avoidance of athletic activity is usually recommended, along with medication for pain and swelling.

Exercise

For children with Sever’s disease, it is important to habitually perform exercises to stretch the hamstrings, calf muscles, and the tendons on the back of the leg. Stretching should be performed 2-3 times a day. Each stretch should be performed for 20 seconds, and both legs should be stretched, even if the pain is only in one heel. Heel cups or an inner shoe heel lifts are often recommended for patient suffering from Sever’s disease. Wearing running shoes with built in heel cups can also decrease the symptoms because they can help soften the impact on the heel when walking, running, or standing.

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